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PART 2: The Challenges of Repeatable and Idempotent Schema Management: Idempotence in Snowflake

PART 2: The Challenges of Repeatable and Idempotent Schema Management: Idempotence in Snowflake

It may appear that most of this should be possible with native SQL statements and indeed some DDL operations in Snowflake are naturally idempotent, whereas others have impacts on data and object state, and some are not idempotent at all. Let’s look at some of the ways SQL tries to help us with this and the problems that remain.

PART 1: The Challenges of Repeatable and Idempotent Schema Management: Introduction

PART 1: The Challenges of Repeatable and Idempotent Schema Management: Introduction

This is the first in a series of blog posts discussing automating the lifecycle events (e.g. creation, alteration, deletion) of database objects which is critical in achieving repeatable DataOps processes. Rather than the database itself being the source of truth for the data structure and models, instead the code within the central repository should define these.

You’re Either Burning Money or Not Meeting Demand with Your Time Series Read/Write Provisioning

You’re Either Burning Money or Not Meeting Demand with Your Time Series Read/Write Provisioning

Unless it’s on Snowflake with Instantaneous Demand

One of the standard promises of Cloud Data Warehouses when compared to their on-premises alternatives is elasticity. As your requirements go up and down, the system can stretch or shrink with them. All such systems are capable of change to some extent. The question is all about timing.

5 Reasons APIs Don’t Work for Data Sharing

5 Reasons APIs Don’t Work for Data Sharing

And 5 Reasons Snowflake’s Data Sharehouse Does

For the past decade the technology world has been obsessed with APIs. While the nature of the APIs themselves has changed over the years (e.g. from SOAP to REST), the premise has always been the same – APIs are the way to allow different systems to share information. This doctrine is so well accepted, no one questions it. Certainly, for transactional processes, such as creating a user account, APIs work fine.